Monthly Archives: October 2012

FAQ Friday – Unemployment extensions are ending. What can I do to prepare?

A: You are correct; extended unemployment insurance benefits are scheduled to end December 30, 2012, which means no more extended benefit payments each week.

Job fairs are only one of several free services offered by 25 Labor offices located throughout the state. This photo is from a job fair held this fall at the Idaho Center in Nampa.

We all know winter is a tough time to be looking for work in Idaho, which is why now is a good time to take advantage of the many Labor services available to help you find a job:

  • Résumés that highlight your skills, knowledge and abilities;
  • Training resources to help upgrade your skills;
  • Job interview assistance including how to organize your thoughts and present yourself as a strong, confident candidate;
  • Answering difficult questions about your work history;
  • Overcoming barriers you think may be preventing you from getting hired; and
  • Using social media to network your way into your next job.

All of these services and more – like job clubs, professional networking groups and every workshop we offer – are available to the public at no cost.

Yes, a good job can still be hard to find in today’s economy, but we see new job listings every day, so give us a call or visit your nearest local office.

FAQ Friday – Why do I have to wait a week to receive unemployment insurance benefits?

Everyone who files for unemployment insurance in Idaho is required to serve one waiting week and will not receive benefits for that week.

A waiting week reflects an unpaid week when you successfully file your weekly report and meet all the eligibility requirements for receiving unemployment insurance.

People who file for unemployment insurance are required to serve only one waiting week per benefit year, which is a calendar year from the date you file your claim. Once you serve your waiting week – even if you are laid off several times a year – you won’t serve a waiting week each time.

Sometimes people hear the ‘waiting week’ and think that means they are supposed to wait a week until filing their initial claim or a weekly report. Help us abolish this myth and DO NOT WAIT to file. If you don’t file, your waiting week is not counted as served and will only further delay the date you receive a benefit payment.

It is possible to work a partial week and still have that count toward your waiting week, however if you earn more than 1½ times your weekly benefit amount, that week does not qualify as a waiting week.  If this happens, the next week reported on your claim that meets all eligibility requirements will be counted as your waiting week.

Why is there such a thing as a waiting week? One reason was to reduce costs of the program or restore stability to a depleted UI trust fund.  Another reason is to provide administrative convenience.  Some states, such as Wisconsin and Kentucky have adopted a waiting week just within the last few years. Most states do not have waiting periods over one week.